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8

These kinds of questions are by definition, too broad. There are too many possible answers for this format. Questions that are too broad don't really need to be considered categorically off-topic per se; they're already too broad. No sense in beating a dead horse. I suppose they may fit under "does not need a lifehack", maybe, but too broad is the most ...


7

No. I don't think we should ever link to online stores. This is already a precedent: when Mr. Cartaino removed an Amazon link for wi-fi equipment, he stated the following reason: Removed the potentially spammy link. There is just too much potential for abuse for this sort of thing. For extremely common household items, I think we should trust people know ...


6

Straight from the manifesto: seeking uncommon solutions to common problems IF the question can reasonably be answered with an uncommon, inexpensive solution, I wholeheartedly believe it's on-topic.


6

If it's a well formed question I don't see why not. Most of the questions asked have cheapness implied. If a person did ask "how to do it cheaper" it would be necessary to judge whether the question is good overall, not just cheapness. The questioner could be asked to reword, too, if necessary. Let's wait until we are overrun by cheapness questions then deal ...


5

tl;dr: Only post one solution in an answer, but variants count as one solution. Now for the full answer: This first came up in a lifehacks manifesto: AND ONE SOLUTION PER ANSWER! We cannot properly vet an answer that contain a list of solutions. There are times that a comprehensive answer might cover more than one variation, but if you see a post that ...


4

No. A Sharpie is a brand, iirc. I asked around to some people and they had no idea what a Sharpie was. So I don't think it hurts to clarify. A way to get around it would be to add a description of what is being mentioned, but we can all search the internet. The exception would have to be product suggestions and showing examples. I wouldn't do this all ...


4

I removed the exact duplicates. In these cases, please use a custom flag on the question saying that many duplicate answers exist. Since the NAA (Not An Answer) and VLQ (Very Low Quality) flags are not generally reviewed with consideration of other answers, they do not work. Also, I will use this opportunity to reiterate part of the manifesto: Each answer ...


3

Paring down answers down to solutions is a bit odd. An answer is expected to explain how to solve a problem. Often, there are multiple methods, each of which, in isolation, could solve the problem, under certain circumstances. A good answer explains, given the problem, how to analyze it in order to choose the best solution. For example: “if you can afford $...


3

The site doesn't want more than one answer per person: You are not prevented, but it does tend to discourage multiple answers from the same person/login.


3

Because there's no right answer. These questions are absolutely off-topic because they are "Primarily opinion-based" or "Too broad" Since the question isn't looking for a solution to a specific problem, the answers could go any of a thousand ways. Such a question may also be closed as "Does not seem to need a lifehack" The ...


2

Sometimes. I do think that links to Amazon or other online stores can sometimes be valuable, especially when writing to a global audience: Things that are common household items in one part of the world may be hard to find locally in other places. By linking to a specific listing in an online store, the reader not only gets a clear idea of what item is ...


1

In general I do agree with the policy of one solution per answer, but there have been situations where I'm inclined to posting multiple solution in one answer. Here is a little quote from A Lifehacks Manifesto (my emphasis): AND ONE SOLUTION PER ANSWER! We cannot properly vet an answer that contain a list of solutions. There are times that a ...


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