24

I don't think this is a good use case for a close reason. Not every question needs a historical context or show of prior efforts. If I want to know what to do with those slivers of soap that are too small to bathe with, rubber-stamping everything with "what have you tried?" makes little sense. But adding it as an explicit close reason has the effect of doing ...


17

The close votes for this reason haven't slowed down, despite this being rejected. Despite Robert's answer about why there should be no such custom close reason, I keep seeing this comment entered over and over on questions along with close votes. So people are still hammering and treating this like an indisputable rule... they're just using the Off-Topic ...


13

If the premise of a question is ill-advised, you should explain your concerns in a comment and either help fix the question or vote to close it as off topic (or whatever reason applies). But creating an explicit close reason for this is overkill. Not all medical questions are categorically off topic. We don't want to create a situation where everyone is ...


11

tl;dr: "No possible hack" is not a valid close reason. Let's start with the question in question. Since you, the OP of this meta question, posted a good, hacky answer, we know there's a valid hack, even if those who voted to close didn't. The question is a specific substitute-tool request. It shows what has been tried... I've already held it up to light ...


9

No, that is not a valid reason to close a question. The thinking behind it might be a variation of the old "too localized" close reason. But that's a historical artifact we ejected quite some time ago, thank goodness. So let me provide a bit of historical context why we should not be rejecting stuff based on too hard or too specialized. Historical ...


9

No. A close vote is not a super-downvote. There is no limitation on how silly a question can be. Downvote silliness all you like, but remember silliness, alone, is not a reason to close a question.


9

I can understand your concern, but as a systemic ongoing problem, I think it's a bit of a stretch to draw that correlation widely — that someone whose answer has been down-voted is more inclined to (or should be prevented from) closing the question itself. But an issue I have seen is users knowingly answering questions they know are going to get ...


8

Normally, we'd just replace the old reason with a new one. But in this case that'd leave a bunch of broken links scattered around the site. So instead, I just trimmed down the text in situ: "Mind hacks" are off topic — Questions dealing with personal productivity and self-improvement tips, with memorization, learning techniques, etc. are outside the ...


7

I don't know. I think that any emergency situation that would warrant a close reason like this shouldn't be on-topic in the first place. If we say that a problem with only one solution, or a problem where the most efficient solution is the most common solution isn't a lifehack, then we could just close these types of questions as being off-topic. For ...


6

This is a tough one. Though I don't think we need one. In the examples in the question and comments, the boundaries are pretty clear; seek medical attention, hire an electrician. In many cases however, the line gets blurred so the average person cannot distinguish when to use such a proposed closing reason anymore. To be more clear; you'll have to be an ...


2

Use a custom close reason. Also, since 'trivial' and 'obvious' are subjective, I really wouldn't want to see either of them on a rubber stamp.


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